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Benefits, Process, and Success of Dental Veneers

Filed under: Veneers — Tags: , , — Park Street Dental @

Are you looking for a way to achieve a perfect set of teeth and a more confident smile? Dental veneers may just be what you need. Dental veneers are thin, custom-made shells designed to cover the front surface of teeth. They are one of the most popular cosmetic dental treatments that can help enhance the appearance of your teeth and boost your self-esteem. In this post, we’ll go over what dental veneers are, the different types of veneers available, and the process of placing them. We’ll also discuss their pros and cons, and what aftercare is involved for dental veneers to last long. Keep reading to find out how dental veneers can change your smile and your life.

What are Dental Veneers?

Dental veneers are custom-made, thin shells that are placed on the front surface of teeth to enhance their appearance. They can be crafted from porcelain or resin composite materials, with porcelain veneers being more durable and closely matching natural tooth color. Dental veneers can be used to correct several dental conditions such as slight misalignments, uneven teeth, abnormal spacing, and discoloration. Veneers can provide strength and resilience comparable to natural tooth enamel and can give people a more aesthetically pleasing smile. Whether you are looking to change the color or shape of your teeth, veneers can give you the confidence and satisfaction you deserve.

Types of Veneers

Dental veneers are custom-made shells made of either porcelain or composite resin that are fitted over the front surface of a tooth to improve its appearance. There are two main types of veneers: porcelain and composite resin. Porcelain veneers are the most popular type of veneers because they resist stains better and are better at mimicking the natural light-reflecting properties of teeth. On the other hand, resin veneers may require less tooth preparation or alteration.

Traditional dental veneers require grinding down the tooth structure, which may involve removing some of the teeth past the enamel. But porcelain veneers are a long-lasting solution to tooth issues that closely mimic the natural light-permeation of natural teeth. So, whether you seek cosmetic correction, restoration, or protection for your teeth, your dentist can help you determine which type of veneer is best suited for your individual needs.

What is the Procedure for Placing Veneers?

The process of placing dental veneers usually involves removing a portion of the tooth’s surface to reshape it. The dentist then customizes the veneer to match the size, shape, and color of the patient’s teeth, which can take a week or more. For patients getting porcelain veneers, two visits are typically required, with a temporary veneer created on the first visit. Once the finished veneers have been created, they are tested for fit and color before being cemented to the tooth. Finally, the dentist removes any excess cement and ensures the patient’s bite is correct before polishing the veneers. Despite the complexity of the process, veneers can dramatically improve the appearance of one’s smile, boosting confidence and self-esteem.

Pros and Cons of Dental Veneers

Dental veneers are a cosmetic dental solution that can help improve the appearance of misshapen, cracked, chipped, discolored, and uneven teeth. They can last between 10 to 15 years with proper care. However, veneers require meticulous dental hygiene care, and it is important to be aware of the pros and cons of the procedure.

While most types of veneers are permanent, no-prep veneers provide a reversible option that requires less time and is less invasive than traditional veneers. However, no-prep veneers are not suited for everyone and might not work as well as traditional veneers. Depending on the condition of the teeth, the dental veneer procedure may require local anesthetics or temporary veneers. It is important to consult a dental professional to determine the best course of action for improving your smile.

Aftercare for Dental Veneers

Dental veneers have become popular because of the magnitude of benefits they bring to the fore. They are designed to cover the teeth’s front surface and improve their overall appearance. To make them last longer, it is essential to care adequately after the procedure. This involves following good oral hygiene practices by brushing and flossing twice a day and rinsing with an antiseptic mouthwash. Additionally, individuals should avoid consuming food and drinks that would stain veneers such as coffee, tea, and red wine. Using a soft-bristled toothbrush and non-abrasive fluoride toothpaste when cleaning can also help maintain the veneer’s appearance. Although dental veneers typically last between 5 to 10 years when adequately maintained, their lifespan largely depends on the individual’s oral hygiene and aftercare practice.

Conclusion

Dental veneers are an excellent option for those looking for a permanent solution to improving the appearance of their teeth. They help change the shape, color, and size of your teeth, giving you the confidence to smile more openly. With proper care and maintenance, dental veneers can last a long time, making them a wise investment. However, not everyone is the right candidate for veneers, and it’s essential to discuss your options with a dental professional. If you’re considering dental veneers, reach out to Park Street Dental of Grove City to book an appointment with our team of experts. We’ll help you assess your suitability and create the perfect smile you’ve always dreamed of. Call us today to schedule an initial appointment. 

How to Know If Dental Crowns Are for You

Filed under: Dental Crown — Park Street Dental @

While keeping and maintaining your natural teeth is the preferred option, so much can go wrong these days and require a restorative solution. When it does, a dental crown is a common choice and can be beneficial in so many ways. Yet, how can you know if dental crowns are for you? Are there certain signs or situations where they are the best option available?

While keeping and maintaining your natural teeth is the preferred option, so much can go wrong these days and require a restorative solution. When it does, a dental crown is a common choice and can be beneficial in so many ways. Yet, how can you know if dental crowns are for you? Are there certain signs or situations where they are the best option available? What are Dental Crowns? Dental crowns have been available for a long time and are highly beneficial in restoring and protecting a natural tooth. Essentially, a crown is a customized, artificial cap that fits over what remains of your natural tooth with the goal of restoring the function and appearance. The dental crown may be made of porcelain, metal, ceramic, or a combination of materials. They are strong, durable, and can be matched in color to your surrounding teeth. The dental crown procedure does require a set of steps, starting with the preparation of the tooth, which may involve grinding away the damaged parts. An impression is made and sent to a dental lab for manufacturing your new crown. Meanwhile, your dentist will fit you with a temporary crown for usually two weeks or so until the permanent one is available. You will then return for another appointment, where the permanent crown will be fitted and cemented into place. How to Know If Dental Crowns Are for You A dental crown is a viable solution for several dental needs. To know whether or not a dental crown is for you, consider the following situations. You Have a Fractured or Broken Tooth Damage to a tooth, such as a fracture or break, can occur suddenly and unexpectedly. You may bite down on a piece of ice, and suddenly you realize you’ve cracked or broken a tooth. It may be extremely obvious or subtle, at least at first. Treatment will be necessary, and the solution you choose will depend on its severity. Most likely, you will need a dental crown to strengthen and support the damaged tooth and provide ongoing protection. If it is a tiny crack or chip, you may be able to seek other solutions, such as dental bonding or veneers. A Tooth Suffers Extreme Decay If your tooth suffers extreme decay, you will need to find a solution that allows you to keep as much of the natural tooth as possible. One way to gauge this need is if the tooth is more than half decayed. If so, a crown is a better option than a filling. Your Tooth Has Large Fillings Already When a tooth requires a large filling, it becomes weaker and prone to cracking. Fillings can also come loose and allow food, sugar, and bacteria to slip underneath, causing additional problems. If your tooth already has a large filling, the remaining tooth structure is weakened and at higher risk of a fracture. A dental crown can protect that tooth from further stress and potential cracks and restore its function. You’ve Recently Undergone a Root Canal Procedure During a root canal procedure, the tooth is hallowed out. As a result, it causes it to weaken and be at a higher risk for fracturing. Your back teeth are particularly vulnerable to such fractures as this is where you do the majority of your chewing. Your dentist will most likely recommend a dental crown as a way to protect and restore enough function to the tooth following this type of procedure. You Need a Dental Bridge or Partial Dentures If you are already missing one or more teeth, you may be considering getting a dental bridge or partial dentures to bridge the gap. However, your natural teeth on either side of the appliance may not be strong enough to serve as a reliable anchor. If so, your dentist will recommend they be fitted with a crown to provide stronger support. A Tooth is Showing Excessive Wear Excessive wearing of a tooth can be problematic. There are a few reasons that can cause this to occur, including tooth enamel erosion, acid reflux disease, or a high-acidic diet. If you grind your teeth at night as you sleep, a condition known as bruxism, you can also wear down teeth. Excessive wear can alter your bite and also lead to other dental issues, so a crown may be your best option to prevent future problems. The Appearance of a Tooth is Interfering with Your Smile Dental crowns can serve as a cosmetic option to help improve your smile by changing the color or shape of your tooth. A crown can also eliminate any noticeable gaps between teeth and improve alignment, making your smile more even while providing a higher level of protection. If you experience any of these conditions or situations, then a dental crown may be the right choice for you. Schedule an appointment with your dentist to get a better diagnosis and to discuss whether a crown will be beneficial for your circumstances. Discover More About the Benefits of Dental Crowns by Contacting Park Street Dental Today Understanding your dental needs is essential to your oral health today. Our team here at Park Street Dental will take the time to provide you will all the information you need, make recommendations, and listen to any concerns you may have. Contact our office today to discover how dental crowns and other restorative and cosmetic dentistry options can benefit you.

What are Dental Crowns?

Dental crowns have been available for a long time and are highly beneficial in restoring and protecting a natural tooth. Essentially, a crown is a customized, artificial cap that fits over what remains of your natural tooth with the goal of restoring the function and appearance. The dental crown may be made of porcelain, metal, ceramic, or a combination of materials. They are strong, durable, and can be matched in color to your surrounding teeth.

The dental crown procedure does require a set of steps, starting with the preparation of the tooth, which may involve grinding away the damaged parts. An impression is made and sent to a dental lab for manufacturing your new crown. Meanwhile, your dentist will fit you with a temporary crown for usually two weeks or so until the permanent one is available. You will then return for another appointment, where the permanent crown will be fitted and cemented into place.

How to Know If Dental Crowns Are for You

A dental crown is a viable solution for several dental needs. To know whether or not a dental crown is for you, consider the following situations.

You Have a Fractured or Broken Tooth

Damage to a tooth, such as a fracture or break, can occur suddenly and unexpectedly. You may bite down on a piece of ice, and suddenly you realize you’ve cracked or broken a tooth. It may be extremely obvious or subtle, at least at first.

Treatment will be necessary, and the solution you choose will depend on its severity. Most likely, you will need a dental crown to strengthen and support the damaged tooth and provide ongoing protection. If it is a tiny crack or chip, you may be able to seek other solutions, such as dental bonding or veneers.

A Tooth Suffers Extreme Decay

If your tooth suffers extreme decay, you will need to find a solution that allows you to keep as much of the natural tooth as possible. One way to gauge this need is if the tooth is more than half decayed. If so, a crown is a better option than a filling.

Your Tooth Has Large Fillings Already

When a tooth requires a large filling, it becomes weaker and prone to cracking. Fillings can also come loose and allow food, sugar, and bacteria to slip underneath, causing additional problems.

If your tooth already has a large filling, the remaining tooth structure is weakened and at higher risk of a fracture. A dental crown can protect that tooth from further stress and potential cracks and restore its function.

You’ve Recently Undergone a Root Canal Procedure

During a root canal procedure, the tooth is hallowed out. As a result, it causes it to weaken and be at a higher risk for fracturing. Your back teeth are particularly vulnerable to such fractures as this is where you do the majority of your chewing. Your dentist will most likely recommend a dental crown as a way to protect and restore enough function to the tooth following this type of procedure.

You Need a Dental Bridge or Partial Dentures

If you are already missing one or more teeth, you may be considering getting a dental bridge or partial dentures to bridge the gap. However, your natural teeth on either side of the appliance may not be strong enough to serve as a reliable anchor. If so, your dentist will recommend they be fitted with a crown to provide stronger support.

A Tooth is Showing Excessive Wear

Excessive wearing of a tooth can be problematic. There are a few reasons that can cause this to occur, including tooth enamel erosion, acid reflux disease, or a high-acidic diet. If you grind your teeth at night as you sleep, a condition known as bruxism, you can also wear down teeth. Excessive wear can alter your bite and also lead to other dental issues, so a crown may be your best option to prevent future problems.

The Appearance of a Tooth is Interfering with Your Smile

Dental crowns can serve as a cosmetic option to help improve your smile by changing the color or shape of your tooth. A crown can also eliminate any noticeable gaps between teeth and improve alignment, making your smile more even while providing a higher level of protection.

If you experience any of these conditions or situations, then a dental crown may be the right choice for you. Schedule an appointment with your dentist to get a better diagnosis and to discuss whether a crown will be beneficial for your circumstances.

Discover More About the Benefits of Dental Crowns by Contacting Park Street Dental Today

Understanding your dental needs is essential to your oral health today. Our team here at Park Street Dental will take the time to provide you will all the information you need, make recommendations, and listen to any concerns you may have. Contact our office today to discover how dental crowns and other restorative and cosmetic dentistry options can benefit you.

Dealing with A Damaged Tooth: What to Do and How Best to Fix It

Filed under: Damaged Teeth — Park Street Dental @

You can be having a fun day outdoors or enjoying a nice meal with friends or family when suddenly you damage a tooth. This damage may be a chipped, cracked, broken, loose, or completely knocked out tooth resulting in pain, sensitivity, or no symptom at all. Knowing how to deal with whatever happens, including what to do and how best to fix it, will be crucial for maintaining the function of that tooth and keeping your smile intact.

Dealing with A Damaged Tooth: What to Do and How Best to Fix It

What To Do When You Have a Damaged Tooth

Your teeth can sustain damage in several ways and may be minor or serious. In most instances, you will need to see a dentist. Depending on the severity, you may even need to seek out an emergency dental office right away.

When such a damaging event occurs, or you recognize that you have a dental issue, you can take immediate steps to treat any pain or other symptom you experience while also protecting your tooth and the mouth’s interior.

Chipped, Cracked, or Broken Tooth

If you break, chip, or crack a tooth, immediately rinse your mouth gently with warm water. If bleeding occurs, apply slight pressure. With a broken tooth, try to find the piece that broke off and wrap it in wet material, preferably gauze, and take it with you to your dentist.

If you experience pain, gently swish warm water around in that area of the mouth again. Next, apply a cold compress to the outer area where the tooth is located to reduce any swelling. If you have an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain reliever (ibuprofen or acetaminophen), take only the recommended dosage. For a natural treatment, try applying clove oil to the gums of the damaged tooth.

Lost Tooth

If you lose a tooth, such as when playing sports, use clean gauze to pick it up. Grasp it only by the crown part and place it back in your mouth, into its socket if at all possible. If you can, rinse it with water before reinserting in your mouth. Avoid rubbing or scrubbing the tooth with your shirt or tissues, and don’t use any type of solution on it.

If the tooth is too damaged to replace back in its socket, immerse it in a glass of water, milk, or saline solution, and take it with you to your dentist immediately.

Lost Filling

Having a lost filling can result in pain or sensitivity when eating, drinking, or even breathing in cold air. If you are unable to get to the dentist right away, consider purchasing a temporary solution from your local drugstore. These solutions usually come in the form of a kit with temporary materials to tuck into the hole in your tooth. A tool to accomplish this may be included in the kit as well.

Jagged Tooth Edges

Chipping of a tooth can leave a jagged edge that can cut into gums, tongue, and sides of the mouth. To keep this from happening, use dental wax to provide a protective coating over the chipped area. You can usually find this wax at drugstores and some grocery stores.

Options for Fixing a Damaged Tooth

There are a number of options for how to fix a damaged tooth. Much will depend on the type of injury and the overall condition of your teeth at the time of the damage. Your dentist will examine your mouth and determine the best course of action to take, which may include one of the following.

New Fillings

The loss of a filling can, in most instances, require a simple fix. Your dentist will first clean and disinfect the hole in your tooth, then add a new filling. This new filling can be tooth-colored so as to blend in with your other teeth.

Dental Crowns

Dental crowns serve as protective caps placed over the top of damaged teeth restoring size, shape, and appearance. These caps can be made of porcelain, ceramic, or metal and are a long-lasting dental solution. Your dentist will need to prepare what remains of your natural tooth, make impressions for creation of the crown, and fit you with a temporary cap until that one is ready.

Dental Bonding

Dental bonding entails applying a composite material to the surface of a cracked or otherwise damaged tooth. Your dentist can mold it to fit the shape of the tooth or adjust that shape to match other teeth. The color shading will also closely match your natural teeth. This composite hardens with the use of a specialized light.

Dental Sealant

A dental sealant creates a barrier across the surface of a tooth, covering cracks and keeping out bacteria that can cause further damage. These sealants are most commonly used on molars.

Veneers

Veneers are thin, shell-like coverings for the surface of teeth. Each one is custom sized and shaped for each tooth and is made of porcelain or composite resin. This option hides cracks and other damage to teeth while improving the appearance of your smile.

Root Canal Procedure

A cracked or broken tooth can have damage far beneath the surface. The inner layer, or pulp chamber, can become infected and require a root canal procedure. This procedure entails a local anesthetic and about two hours in the dentist’s chair. Afterward, you will most likely need a dental crown to protect the remaining structure of the tooth and allow for normal chewing.

Dental Implant

If you lose a tooth, or the tooth is so damaged that it requires extraction, you may choose to have a dental implant. A screw-like device is implanted into the jawbone, upon which you will need a crown or dental bridge.

Contact Park Street Dental for All Your Dental Care Needs

Whether you suddenly damage a tooth or need to seek a solution for another dental issue, Park Street Dental is here to help. Our team can provide the treatment and solution you need and help you maintain a healthy mouth and smile. Contact our dental office to schedule an appointment today.

What are the Best Types of Dentures?

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Your oral health is not only important to your smile, but to your ability to eat, speak, and laugh normally without worry or self-consciousness. Dental solutions abound today to help with this, and if you are missing multiple teeth or experience damage that may lead to such a loss, it may be time to consider how you can benefit from dentures.

Why Choose Dentures?

Dentures are a row of natural-looking prosthetic teeth that are meant to replace those that are missing. The common reasons you may need dentures will be due to loosened, damaged, weak, injured, or missing teeth that can result from any of the following:

  • Injury or trauma to the mouth
  • Extreme tooth decay forming in several teeth
  • Advanced periodontal disease
  • Oral diseases
  • Genetics

If you’re still not sure whether or not dentures are the right choice for you, consider the several benefits they can offer, including:

  • Improvements in speech and eating ability
  • Preservation of facial structures
  • Easy care and maintenance
  • A boost to self-confidence by allowing you to share your smile more often.
  • Long-lasting choice, with most dentures lasting 10 years or more with proper care.
  • Cost-effective, with different types available to meet patients’ various needs and budgets.

What are the Different Types of Dentures?

Various types of dentures exist today, but the three most common categories are full (traditional), partial, and implant dentures.

1. Full (Traditional) Dentures

If you are missing most or all of your upper and lower teeth, full, traditional dentures are a good choice. Your dentist may also recommend these when the majority of your teeth are weak or decayed or your teeth need extraction for other reasons.

Full, traditional dentures are usually porcelain or acrylic with a pink metal or acyclic base. Placement usually occurs between 8 and 12 months after teeth are extracted or removed.

Once your jaw and gum tissue heal (from extractions or other issues), your dentist will fit you with full dentures which sit directly on the gums. These will stay in place with the help of natural suction or with the use of a dental adhesive. In some instances, you may need both.

One of the truly beneficial things about full dentures is that they are removable for cleaning and before going to sleep at night. Just place them in water or a dental cleanser recommended by your dentist, then rinse before reinserting inside your mouth.

2. Partial Dentures

Partial dentures are convenient and removable and often recommended when a patient maintains at least some of their natural teeth.

These dentures usually contain a pinkish acrylic base that closely matches the color of your gums. Attached to this base are ceramic teeth chosen to blend in with your natural teeth. Metal clasps hold the partial denture in place between your remaining teeth, creating a seamless smile.

An additional advantage to wearing partial dentures is that they help keep the other teeth from shifting or moving out of place.

3. Implant Supported dentures

Implant supported dentures are a high-quality replacement for missing teeth that are long-lasting and natural looking.

To wear this type of denture, you will first need to undergo a surgical procedure to embed screw-like titanium posts in your gums.

Once these dental implant posts are secured below the gum line, they will begin to fuse with the jaw bone, creating a strong, stable foundation. Depending on whether you need a full row or only a partial denture, you may require up to four of these implanted posts to secure the denture in place.

Implant supported dentures are permanent and more stable, so you won’t have to fret about them slipping or moving as you eat, speak, or laugh. They look natural and restore chewing power, so you can continue to enjoy most, if not all, of your favorite foods.

What are the Best Types of Dentures?

When it comes to what are the best types of dentures, the answer depends on each patient’s individual needs and personal preferences. While all three categories listed above are beneficial, the one you choose needs to fit your individual needs and your lifestyle as well.

Factors that need consideration when choosing the best type of denture for you include the following.

Pre-Denture Procedures

Some types of dentures may require removal of additional teeth. You and your dentist will need to discuss this need and whether you want to proceed. Also, if you are considering implant supported dentures, your jawbone will need evaluating. If you do not have enough bone, you may need to undergo more invasive procedures such as bone augmentation or grafting. Decide if this is something you want to pursue or choose to go with the full or partial dentures that do not require the implants.

Comfortability

Comfort is key when it comes to wearing dentures, so you will need to choose the one that meets this requirement for you personally. Consider the materials used to make each type and whether the removable or permanent type will be more comfortable for you.

Care and Maintenance

In general, full and partial removable dentures require additional care and maintenance. In addition to brushing and flossing your natural teeth, you will now need to remove, soak, clean, and rinse your dentures each day. Implant supported dentures, however, are fixed in place, so you will care for them in much the same way as your natural teeth.

Your Budget

The different types of dentures also come with different costs. Discuss these costs with your dentist and determine which one will best fit with your budget.

In many situations, dentures are the right solution for patients, and knowing all you can before and after will be beneficial as you move forward. Schedule a consultation and exam with your dentist to find out what will work best for you.

Schedule an Appointment with Park Street Dental to Learn More About Dentures

Determining what type of dentures are best for you is a big decision. Park Street Dental can help by providing you with all the information you need to make an informed decision. We will also help you through each step in the process and be here for you in the years ahead.

To find out more about what types of dentures are available and which will benefit you the most, contact our office today to schedule an appointment with our patient-dedicated team.

What is TMJ and what is it caused by?

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When it comes to oral health issues, the first thing most people think about are problems with the teeth or gums. Yet, the health of your jaw is also important. Issues affecting this part of the mouth and facial structure can impact you in a number of ways. Developing TMJ is one such issue, which can worsen over time and often require treatment. Knowing the symptoms for this condition and what can cause it will be beneficial in helping you maintain good oral health over the long term.

What is TMJ?

Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ) is a condition affecting the hinge or joint that connects your jawbone to the skull on both sides of the face. It can also affect facial nerves and the jaw muscles as well.

Within the joints of the jaw, tiny disks serve as a type of shock absorber and separate the cartilage located in the area. When these disks become misaligned or experience erosion over time, TMJ disorder can occur. Without diagnosis and treatment, this disorder will continue to progress, leading to additional problems.

What are the Symptoms of TMJ?

Symptoms you may be experiencing that indicate TMJ disorder can include:

  • Jaw clicking or popping: A common sign of TMJ is the clicking or popping in the jaw area as you yawn, eat, or speak. The more often this occurs, and the stronger the sensation or sound becomes, the higher the likelihood that the joints in your jaw are damaged to some degree.
  • Swelling: In some instances, you may notice swelling, either mild or severe, on a side of the face, and this can indicate inflammation building up within the joint of the jaw.
  • Jaw locking in place: Upon opening your mouth, your jaw may temporarily lock in place, then eventually release with a clicking sound.
  • Difficulty chewing: Jaw misalignment and TMJ can lead to difficulty in chewing your food. If you have severe misalignment, the muscles of your mouth will begin to try to compensate when you chew.
  • Pain or tenderness in the jaw area: With dental misalignment and TMJ, the jaw muscles try to compensate, and as a result, you may experience pain or tenderness in this area.
  • Other symptoms, including ringing in the ears or dizziness.

To make a definitive diagnosis, your dentist will need to start with an oral exam, which includes looking for your range of motion as you open your mouth and feeling the areas surrounding the jaw to see if you experience tenderness, pain, or other discomfort.

Next, you may need X-rays, a CT scan, or an MRI for your dentist to gain a more in-depth look at what is going on inside the jaw’s bones, muscles and tissues. If a diagnosis is still not definitive, your dentist may conduct a TMJ arthroscopy in which a tiny tube containing a camera is inserted into the jaw joint area.

What Causes TMJ?

While TMJ is not easily diagnosed in most instances, there are particular causes behind the condition, including teeth misalignment, injury, bruxism, genetics, and certain types of arthritis.

Teeth Misalignment

The most common cause of TMJ is teeth misalignment. Your dentist will look for any misalignment in your bite and also ask you direct questions relating to symptoms of TMJ. Solutions abound for correcting the misalignment of teeth and, in turn, treating any developing problems in the jaw.

Jaw Injury

Trauma to the jaw area can cause an injury to the Temporomandibular joint or the surrounding muscles and tissues. TMJ symptoms can soon follow, alerting you to see your dentist as soon as possible. If you seek medical attention for such an injury, the attending physician may also refer you to a dental professional for further examination.

Bruxism

Bruxism is the continual grinding and clenching of teeth at night as you sleep. This act is usually an unconscious activity, and you may be unaware that you are doing it. The longer it occurs, however, the higher your risk of developing a TMJ disorder. To help, your dentist can provide you with night guards to wear to prevent the grinding and clenching.

Genetics

Many oral health issues are attributable to your genetics. Bone structure and more can be affected by these genetics and sometimes lead to TMJ conditions.

Arthritis (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.)

Patients can suffer arthritis in the jaw, and this can cause the occurrence of TMJ disorders. Common symptoms of this include inflammation, pain, and restricted jaw movement.

If you experience one or more of the symptoms listed above, be sure to schedule a dental appointment as soon as possible to determine if you have a TMJ disorder and, if so, to find out what treatments are available.

Contact Park Street Dental to Learn More About TMJ

If you currently suffer with any of the symptoms of TMJ disorder or would like to learn more information about it and what treatments are available, contact the dedicated team here at Park Street Dental. We will provide you with the information you need and also the services to help you maintain your smile and dental health going forward.

What is a Dental Deep Cleaning?

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Scheduling biannual dental cleanings is a good way to keep your smile looking its best and also helps to maintain a healthy mouth. While this level of cleaning may be all you need, that can change at some point in your life, especially if you start to experience gum disease. In such instances, many patients will benefit from something more, including a dental deep cleaning.

patient getting dental cleaning

Your preventive care cleaning is more about maintenance, removing built-up tartar and plaque, and giving your teeth a polish. A dental deep cleaning goes beyond the surface of the teeth. This type of cleaning, also referred to as scaling and planing, centers on the portions of teeth that sit near and beyond the gum line.

Dental deep cleaning is a special, non-invasive technique used to remove bacteria, plaque, and tartar. It can halt the progression of gum disease and prevent tooth loss in patients as well.

Who Will Benefit from a Dental Deep Cleaning?

Dental deep cleaning is not meant for everyone. Patients diagnosed with gum disease, either the initial, milder stage of gingivitis or a more advanced stage of periodontitis, will benefit the most from a deep cleaning procedure.

While it may or may not be obvious that you have gum disease, you can often tell if you experience bad breath, loose teeth, or bleeding, swelling, or tenderness in the gums. A visual clue that you may have gum disease is when you see your gums pulling away from your teeth, exposing more of the tooth in the process.

A patient experiencing gum disease will also have pockets developing between teeth and gums. These pockets, or gaps, can expose more of the tooth root. Your dentist will measure these gaps to determine how advanced your gum disease is currently. After a dental deep cleaning, these gaps will again be measured. You should see a reduction in the gap between your teeth and gums as a result.

What Happens During a Dental Deep Cleaning Procedure?

The dental deep cleaning procedure may be used in one or two affected areas of your mouth or an entire section, such as half of your upper teeth region. Each patient is unique, and your treatment can differ based on how prevalent the gum disease has become.

While you may feel some discomfort, your dentist will give you a local anesthetic to create some numbness. Only one-half of your mouth will be numbed during a visit, so you will most likely need to return for a second appointment to care for the opposite side.

The cleaning involves two methods – scaling and planing.

Scaling

With the aid of a handheld dental device, your dentist will gently scrape the teeth to remove plaque and tartar near the gumline. This method includes both above and below where your teeth join with the gums.

For harder to reach areas, your dentist may use an ultrasonic tool with a vibrating tip. The vibration helps to dislodge any plaque and tartar that may be hiding there. A water spray may also be used to help wash the tartar away.

The scaling procedure can take anywhere between one and four hours, depending on the severity of the infection of the gums.

Planing

To smooth out any rough areas on the roots of teeth, your dentist will use a rubbing motion. This smoothing-out method will make it more difficult for plaque, tartar, or bacteria to stick to these areas going forward.

Your dentist may also apply an antibiotic gel during the deep cleaning to get to the harder to reach germs that linger or might prescribe an antibiotic mouth rinse.

For a few days after the procedure, you’ll need to be careful brushing as your gums will feel tender and may bleed. You will also want to avoid hot or cold beverages for a few days. Tooth sensitivity can remain for 1-2 weeks, which is entirely normal, but if you become concerned, contact your dentist right away.

Follow all the directions provided by your dentist and return at the recommended time so your dentist can check how your mouth is healing. During this follow-up appointment, your dentist will once again measure the pockets, or gaps, between teeth and gums to see if a reduction is occurring.

Contact Park Street Dental to Find out More about Dental Deep Cleaning and Gum Disease

When it comes to efficiently caring for your teeth and gums, knowing how a dental deep cleaning can help is beneficial. Whether you want to learn more about gum disease or believe you are already experiencing it, the compassionate team here at Park Street Dental can help. We will evaluate your oral health and, if needed, make personalized recommendations for cleanings or other beneficial treatments. Call our dental office today to schedule a consultation.

4 Tips for Recovery After the All-on-4 Treatment

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Senior man at home smiling after All-on-4

With the All-on-4 procedure, you can get a full row of sturdy new teeth supported by just four implant posts. And thanks to the way All-on-4 dental implants are placed, you may be able to get new teeth on the same day as the surgery! That said, you will need to give yourself time to recover after the treatment. Here are 4 tips that can help ensure that you have a smooth, successful healing period.

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Non-Anxiety Benefits of Sedation Dentistry

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Woman at dentist using nitrous oxideDid you know 36% of the population suffers from dental-related anxieties? Sedation dentistry can help patients conquer their fears to enjoy their time in the dental chair. However, it can help patients with other unique situations, too. Even if your palms don’t sweat before your appointment, here are a few non-anxiety benefits of sedation dentistry.

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Busting 3 Popular Myths About Dental Implants

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Myth busting on yellow envelope Bridges and dentures have been used for generations to treat tooth loss; however, 500,000 people every year are choosing another solution. A dental implant is the only method to replace both the root and crown, creating a perfect replica of a real tooth. If you’ve lost a tooth or two, you might not believe they are right for you because you’ve heard a few concerning stories. Did you know much of what you’ve been told may not be true? Don’t let rumors stop you from investing in the next best thing to your natural teeth. Here are 3 facts behind common dental implant myths.

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Is Cleaning Dentures While Wearing Them A Good Idea?

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man smiling before cleaning dentures in Grove City

Dentures are one of the most popular and cost-effective methods of replacing missing teeth. While they’re durable and long-lasting, you must preserve them by keeping them clean. Though you’ll want to take them off occasionally, is it okay to brush your restorations while wearing them? Read on to learn why cleaning dentures with them on may not be a good idea, and the best ways to maintain them for the long run!

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